Connected objects are not that close to revolutionize the sport market

sport

Author and Contributor

Mathieu Thomyre

Friday, 16th of January, Google decided to stop its Google Glass project for B to C market. The decision sounds like an earthquake, and most of all for some companies like Nike, which had invested on applications for this new technology. Nike had, few months before, announced the end of their FuelBand project and the possibility to fire their entire team taking care of connected objects. This smart band would have been connected to your smartphone to calculate all your moves during the day, during sport activities and help you follow your program and objectives. But why, such amazing objects like Google Glass or the FuelBand, especially in the sport market, are so controverted? What is the future for connected objects in sport?

Technology and sports are very connected. When technology allowed human being to have results in sport that no one could have had before, when new shoes allowed Usain Bolt to run 100m under 10 seconds, when the new skis allow professional skiers to go always faster, technology has also risen many debates. Is it ethical to use technology for sport? Is it ethical to climb the Everest with an oxygen bottle? Innovation represents in the same time the improvement and the death of sport as we see it. So how will be connected object accepted by human beings?

Connected objects are already invading the market in spite of some failures like I mentioned with Google glass and Nike FuelBand. It is a help to performance. Babolat have integrated a censor in their rackets in 2013 in order to be able to calculate all the efforts, curves, touch points of the ball while a tennis man is training. Raphael Nadal is using it every day. As another very different example, Deeper is a censor which will help fisherman being much better in fishing. Indeed, this little piece of technology can take photos and calculate a lot of information which will help you being more and more efficient when choosing a place to fish. But connected object will also have medical inputs. Jolt Sensor is a new “magic” connected object which appeared last year in crowdfunding platforms. This censor that you will put on your head, will be able to calculate any source of traumatism in violent sports like boxe, rugby… and tell your smartphone at the moment your brain is in danger. It will able people to know when they have to really stop and when a knock can be dangerous.

Obviously connected objects will allow us to increase again a bit our performances, to run quicker, to be much more efficient at training and to know our body and take fewer risks. However, aren’t these special criteria, this fear you feel in your heart while running an ultra-trail and asking yourself if your body is still capable to run after 80 km compulsory for sport emotion? Isn’t that moment we look for in sport, when you reach the top of the higher mountain in the world without oxygen bottle and telling you: “I did it alone, as a human being”.

This debate could last years and years as you will tell me an ethical sportive will not use shoes, neither rope or ice axe to climb the mountain. I would answer that the question is not “should we use technology”? Obviously yes. The real question is: to each point will we use technology before it reaches an “unethical” point? I am not the only one asking myself this question as the society has already rejected many projects because of this ethic detail.

So are connected objects the future of sport? Should all companies rush into this market before they lose their credibility through their customer? I am strongly looking forward to seeing new projects from sport companies and how will the society accept or reject it.

Friday, 16th of January, Google decided to stop its Google Glass project for B to C market. The decision sounds like an earthquake, and most of all for some companies like Nike, which had invested on applications for this new technology. Nike had, few months before, announced the end of their FuelBand project and the possibility to fire their entire team taking care of connected objects. This smart band would have been connected to your smartphone to calculate all your moves during the day, during sport activities and help you follow your program and objectives. But why, such amazing objects like Google Glass or the FuelBand, especially in the sport market, are so controverted? What is the future for connected objects in sport?

Technology and sports are very connected. When technology allowed human being to have results in sport that no one could have had before, when new shoes allowed Usain Bolt to run 100m under 10 seconds, when the new skis allow professional skiers to go always faster, technology has also risen many debates. Is it ethical to use technology for sport? Is it ethical to climb the Everest with an oxygen bottle? Innovation represents in the same time the improvement and the death of sport as we see it. So how will be connected object accepted by human beings?

Connected objects are already invading the market in spite of some failures like I mentioned with Google glass and Nike FuelBand. It is a help to performance. Babolat have integrated a censor in their rackets in 2013 in order to be able to calculate all the efforts, curves, touch points of the ball while a tennis man is training. Raphael Nadal is using it every day. As another very different example, Deeper is a censor which will help fisherman being much better in fishing. Indeed, this little piece of technology can take photos and calculate a lot of information which will help you being more and more efficient when choosing a place to fish. But connected object will also have medical inputs. Jolt Sensor is a new “magic” connected object which appeared last year in crowdfunding platforms. This censor that you will put on your head, will be able to calculate any source of traumatism in violent sports like boxe, rugby… and tell your smartphone at the moment your brain is in danger. It will able people to know when they have to really stop and when a knock can be dangerous.

Obviously connected objects will allow us to increase again a bit our performances, to run quicker, to be much more efficient at training and to know our body and take fewer risks. However, aren’t these special criteria, this fear you feel in your heart while running an ultra-trail and asking yourself if your body is still capable to run after 80 km compulsory for sport emotion? Isn’t that moment we look for in sport, when you reach the top of the higher mountain in the world without oxygen bottle and telling you: “I did it alone, as a human being”.

This debate could last years and years as you will tell me an ethical sportive will not use shoes, neither rope or ice axe to climb the mountain. I would answer that the question is not “should we use technology”? Obviously yes. The real question is: to each point will we use technology before it reaches an “unethical” point? I am not the only one asking myself this question as the society has already rejected many projects because of this ethic detail.

So are connected objects the future of sport? Should all companies rush into this market before they lose their credibility through their customer? I am strongly looking forward to seeing new projects from sport companies and how will the society accept or reject it.

Photo Source: http://www.unlockpwd.com/select-5-items-connected-for-sport/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s