Darty – The Contract of Confidence

Darty is a French firm specializing in electrical retailing. Wholly-owned subsidiary of the UK company Kesa Electrical Pl. Currently, Darty is mainly present in France, with 224 stores. The company is quite famous in France, and had revenues of €2921 million in 2011, with a 4.6% positive change compared to 2010 (Platt, 2011). The interesting point of the company is that it is highly focused on enhancing its relationship with the customers. Darty makes this customer relationship management its main argument for sale.

Today, and since its creation, Darty’s originality comes from the willingness of committing in terms of price, choice and service. This customer relationship management is based on what is called the “contract of confidence”, which represents the company’s promise. It is the pillar on which Darty’s strategy relies. Continue reading

CRM in Football – The Case of Manchester City FC

Customer relationship management applies beyond the traditional product and service offerings. CRM has become a core strategic element of sports clubs that recognise the importance of managing and understanding their supporters. For many fans, the football brand is a passion! Due to their cultural ties and emotional appeal, sports clubs surpass organisations operating outside the realm of sports in brand adoration and loyalty. However, this brand craze creates a complex environment and requires careful management and anticipation. This process is especially difficult in the football industry where competition over followers is fierce. It is evident that football without fans wouldn’t be the sport that it is today; a weak fan base leads football clubs to ruin. Fans, as customers, are the base of the football club’s economic model and should not be taken for granted; they fill up stadiums, buy merchandise, and attract sponsorships. Continue reading

This Must be Africa

With investment levels surpassing $120 billion last year alone, Chinese companies have been increasing their business activities in Africa over the last decade (see graph below). All in all, their involvements have done more to fight poverty than any other country in the world by speeding up economic growth and producing jobs. However in the past few years, Africans have started contemplating whether there is a hidden agenda underneath all the investments. Are all the investments just modern colonisation? And why are Western businesses not as eager to enter the African markets? This article will uncover some factors that determine why Chinese investors find Africa so much more attractive than their Western counterparts. Continue reading

Foxconn’s Liason with Sharp

A new alliance against the industry’s number one Samsung forms in East Asia. The Hon-Hai group from Taiwan, better known under the name ‘Foxconn’, as the producer under contract of Apple’s iPhone and iPad, bought 10% of the Japanese electronic enterprise Sharp. The stock exchange reacted with a jump on the announcement of the new Sharp president Takashi Okuda, who is supposed to officially take over the lead of the company in the beginning of April. The stock price of Sharp rose 15%. Okuda announced that Sharp’s strategy will change. They had been trying to get along solo but the pressure from competition was too high. Continue reading

Virgin People

Of the world’s top twenty brands, Virgin is the only one to “challenge” and diversify away from its core competencies. The company has businesses in banking, telecommunications, transport, and so on; whereas, compared to the CocaCola company, their product line, successful as it is, doesn’t stray far from beverages. Therefore, the question that must be addresses is how can Virgin do this? How can it be so prolific in comparison to other giant brands of the world? Surely, one man’s endearing personality cannot turn branding on its head to such an extent that the company’s customers will follow him anywhere!? Continue reading

Secret Sauce for M&A Success

Big Merger & Acquisitions are ubiquitous even in times of economic difficulties. Be it the acquisition of Wyeth by Pfizer Inc for $ 64.5 Billion or Rio Tinto’s acquisition by the Australian mining behemoth, BHP Billiton for $58 billion, M&A deals are part and parcel of the corporate strategy to grow at breakneck pace as companies look to grow inorganically. Almost 60% of all M&A’s fail. Here in this article, I try to dig deep to understand the reasons behind such a high failure rate and unearth the main factors required for an M&A to succeed. Continue reading

Google Plus: A Brief Insight

Google Inc. launched Google+ on June 28, 2011 in an invite-only “Beta testing” phase . Users were then allowed to invite their friends and to create their accounts. The following day, this policy was dropped due to an ‘insane demand for accounts’ (Shaer, Matthew). Google announced on July 14th, 2011 that Google Plus had reached ten million users just two weeks after its limited trial phase . After four weeks, it had reached 25 million. Google’s biggest market was the US, followed then by India (Google+ Draws). Larry Page then declared that the service had reached 40 million users in October 2011. Males have been the majority of early adopters of Google+ (71.24%). The dominant age range is between 25 and 34. A survey estimates 13% of US adults have joined Google Plus and is projected to have 22% of US adults in a year.

Five Reasons Why Google+ Failed
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