Emerging markets multinational enterprises

Emerging market multinational enterprises (EMME) is a key term being discussed by economists and analysts for the past decade. Emerging market multinationals are companies that have been considered rising stars showing up on lists such as S&P 100 and FT Global 500. Based on the Financial Times, “in just two years, from 2006 to 2008, the number of Brazilian, Chinese, Indian and Russian MNEs on the FT Global 500 more than quadrupled from 15 to 62, in September 2010 there were 80. (Lexicon)”

Until a few years ago, multinationals from developed countries were shaping the market we live in, creating opportunities, making acquisitions, expanding and making foreign direct investments in developing markets. The global market was dominated by multinationals from developed economies. These experienced multinationals were investing in FDI’s and were in fact also contributing their knowledge and sharing their experiences with the small-medium enterprises (SME) in emerging economies. Recently, this context has changed with the rise of companies from rapidly developing economies. From what SME’s have learned from these multinational companies and with the contribution of external forces, such as governments, low labor costs, and several others, they have become global key players. Continue reading

Foxconn’s Liason with Sharp

A new alliance against the industry’s number one Samsung forms in East Asia. The Hon-Hai group from Taiwan, better known under the name ‘Foxconn’, as the producer under contract of Apple’s iPhone and iPad, bought 10% of the Japanese electronic enterprise Sharp. The stock exchange reacted with a jump on the announcement of the new Sharp president Takashi Okuda, who is supposed to officially take over the lead of the company in the beginning of April. The stock price of Sharp rose 15%. Okuda announced that Sharp’s strategy will change. They had been trying to get along solo but the pressure from competition was too high. Continue reading

Are 3D TV’s ever going to become a commodity?

Photo by Lars

When the 3D television was launched it was estimated to be a huge success. This was mostly attributed to the great success of the 3D movies in the cinemas; but for the home TV watching audience it was not the case. There are many companies in the market selling 3D television’s such as Panasonic, Samsung and LG, but one of the first ones to launch the 3D TVs, and one of the more “successful” companies selling them, was Sony with a 43.3% market share in the 4th quarter of 2010. Continue reading

The Curious Case of Apple and the iPhone 4S

iPhone 4S, Why not iPhone 5?

This is exactly the question millions are asking after analysing the product and the new advertisement. Apple’s product launches have always been eagerly anticipated but this one produced more frustration than amazement. The new phone carries a dual core A5 chip capable of 7 times faster graphics than A4, a new voice recognition system “Siri”, icloud and an improved camera with improved video capabilities. Although it lacks the “Wow” factor that one normally associates with Apple products but from the marketing and branding point of view, it has enough changes to carry the new brand iPhone 5. Continue reading

Tablet Wars

Photo by DailyM

In order to make a relevant comparison between two very similar products, and regarding all the recent controversies between Apple and Samsung, I have chosen to talk about the two latest tablets launched by both competitors.

I have chosen to talk about the iPad2 which has been well received by consumers; and compare this product’s sales performance with that of the Samsung galaxy tab 10.1.

Before we start to study the details of each company and their respective product on the market, it is important to identify that both products are technologically similar. This means that theoretically, if these two products were given to a user without any context and environment, this user could get the same satisfaction from either product. It seems evident that the iPad2 has over performed in comparison to Samsung’s tablet. The aim is to understand firstly, why the iPad2 has had so much success in the current market; and secondly, why the galaxy tab, a similar product, has been so commercially dismal. Continue reading